Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Home Grown: Hold the Salt and Save the Plants.

Salt can cause problems for gardeners, especially if they live in a northern climate and use salt to clear ice from driveways or sidewalks.

There are many de-icing compounds on the market, and while they all set out to do the same job, there are some that are more friendly to lawns and other plants growing in the garden.

When shopping for de-icing agents, read the package label for ingredients. It may not be wise to choose the cheapest one on the shelf.

Continued in... Hold the Salt and Save the Plants.

Home Grown
Home and Garden Center
Artwork: Hand Held Spreader For Ice Melt

Sunday, November 15, 2015

Home Grown: Overwintering Geraniums.

You can beat the frost and save your geraniums by taking them inside to overwinter.

In freezing temperatures, unprotected annual geraniums will turn a mushy green and die. They can be preserved, however, by overwintering indoors before they get nipped by a hard frost.

Pot up the plants, take cuttings, or store the plants as bare-root specimens.Whichever method you choose, understand that success isn’t guaranteed.

Continued in... Overwintering Geraniums.

Home Grown
Home and Garden Center
Artwork: Geraniums

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Potted Perennials in Winter

Taking care of your potted perennial plants over the winter will ensure they are around next season to provide another year of enjoyment.

Container gardening is a form of gardening everyone can enjoy no matter how large or small their garden may be. Those with only a balcony or patio can enjoy the pleasures of gardening just as those with areas of space.  Containers can be quite elaborate, and the types of plant material can be quite varied. When it comes to what gardeners are putting into containers, the trend is leaning toward just about anything.

At one time annuals were the majority, if not the only type, of plant material being used in containers.  Now everything from perennials to small trees and shrubs are being grown.

Continued in... Potted Perennials in Winter.

Plants and Seeds
Home and Garden Center
Artwork: Wooden Basket with 6 Live Plants

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Home Grown: Selecting Holiday Plants

When the winter holiday season approaches, it is time to purchase holiday plants.

As with most holiday purchases, shop early to ensure that you get the plant of your choice. Purchase clean, healthy plants that are properly identified.

Plants should have dark green foliage and abundant unopened flower buds or fruit. Wrap them carefully before transporting them to avoid subjecting them to freezing outdoor temperatures.

Continued in... Selecting Holiday Plants.

Plants and Seeds
Artwork: Poinsettia

Monday, November 9, 2015

Home Grown: Preventing Sunscald

Homeowners who planted new trees this year, especially ones with thin bark, will want to protect the southwest side of the new tree this winter to protect it from sunscald.

Many young, smooth, thin-barked trees like honey locusts, fruit trees, ashes, oaks, maples, lindens, red buds and willows are susceptible to sunscald and bark cracks.

Sunscald normally develops on the south or southwest side of a tree during late winter. Sunscald and bark cracks can lead to the death of a tree if it is not given special care.

Continued in... Preventing Sunscald.

Home and Garden Center
Garden Tools
Artwork: Tree Wrap

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Here's How To... Make An Arrowhead

Flintknapping is the making of flaked or chipped stone tools. This technology was used in historic times to manufacture gun flints and in prehistoric times to make spear and dart points, arrow heads, knives, scrapers, blades, gravers, perforators, and many other tools.

Flintknapping requires the ability to control the way rocks break when they are struck. The best rock is somewhat brittle and uniform in texture and structure, lacking frost fractures, inclusions, or other flaws. This type of rock is very fine grained or non-grained. The best rocks for flint-knapping are chert, flint, chalcedony, quartzite, jasper, and obsidian. These rock types, when struck with another rock, piece of antler, or bone, will fracture or break in a characteristic pattern called a conchoidal fracture. This creates a rock fragment called a flake.

The production process begins with a piece of raw material, called a core. Flakes are removed by striking the edge of the core with a sharp, forceful blow, in what is called percussion flaking.

Follow the link to... Make An Arrowhead.

Here's How To...
How To Do It
Artwork: Spearhead Points

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Mount St. Helens Christmas Ornaments from Curtis, Washington

Now available in The Gift Shop:
Mount St. Helens Christmas Ornaments direct from the artist in Curtis, Washington

Hand blown from the volcanic ash of Mount St Helen’s, these colorful glass Christmas ornaments are perfect gifts for the ornament collector and anyone who enjoys and appreciates fine art glass.

An ornament stand is included with each ornament display year-round on a desk or table.

Available in four different colors: Azure, Evergreen, Ice, Rose.

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