Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Plant of the Week: Pinyon Pine


This is a short and scrubby tree, rarely reaching 30 feet or more, that is widely distributed across the Southwest and Rocky Mountain regions of western North America. A major indicator tree in the pinyon-juniper life zone, P. edulis grows very slowly; trees with diameters of 4 - 6 inches can be several hundred years old.

Typically growing in pure stands or with juniper, the pinyon pine produces chunky little cones that produce a tasty nut, the pine nut. The wood of this tree is very fragrant when burned.

continued at the Farmer's Market Online Guide to Pinyon Pine

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Monday, October 23, 2017

Recipe Archive: Puree of Asaragus Soup


from
The Historic Kentucky Kitchen
Traditional Recipes for Today's Cook
by Deirdre A. Scaggs and Andrew W. McGraw
The University Press of Kentucky, 2013

According to authors of The Historic Kentucky Kitchen, this 1897 soup recipe packs a lot of flavor, considering how simple it is and how few ingredients are in the recipe. To make the soup more elegant and add texture, reserve the tips of the asparagus spears after poaching to use as a garnish.

full recipe in The Recipe Archive

Artwork: Asparagus Soup
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Monday, October 16, 2017

Home Grown: Identifying Emerald Ash Borer


As fall's colors emerge, it's hard to miss the striking gold and purple leaves of ash trees lining streets and roads in many Midwestern U.S. states. However, when emerald ash borer arrives, many ash trees planted in towns, cities and conservation plantings could be lost.
     
First detected in southeast Michigan in 2002, emerald ash borer, or EAB, is an exotic beetle that attacks and kills all native ash species, including white, green, black and autumn purple ash. To date, the beetle is present in 31 U.S. states as well as two Canadian provinces and has killed about 200 million ash trees.

Continued in... Identifying Emerald Ash Borer

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Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Rural Delivery: A Bite Most Deadly




by Michael Hofferber. Copyright © 1995. All rights reserved.

Some folks are afraid of spiders, others snakes. Lightning puts the fear of God in many of us, and so do earthquakes, tornadoes and dark moonless nights. Living in the country presents many special worries, like the threat of wildfire or the potential for flash floods. More cars collide with wild animals on rural roads than city lanes and the chances of eating a poisonous mushroom or contracting the deadly hantavirus are much greater off the beaten path. But there is no threat so terrifying in rural places, or as fatally serious as rabies.

Growing up, I learned to keep a wary eye on grape arbors and tall, dark hedges of lilacs lest some crazed bat should emerge, grab hold of my hair, bite my scalp and infect me with rabies. Older cousins planted a terror of rabies in my pre-school mind with accounts of the terrible vaccination shots in the belly that bat bite victims had to endure and how, more often than not, the bitten person went crazy and was committed to an asylum, ranting and raving and foaming at the mouth.

Continued at... A Bite Most Deadly

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Artwork: Mad Dog

Home Grown: Composting Yard Waste


While it may seem easy to put those raked leaves and other yard waste in plastic bags and toss them out as garbage, composting can be just as easy and much better for the environment.

"Many landfills no longer even accept leaves or garden wastes," notes Bill Lamont, professor of vegetable crops at Penn State.  "Composting may be the easiest way for homeowners to dispose of them."

Composting decomposes organic matter into a dark, crumbly material similar to humus. Finished compost provides nutrients and helps soil retain water by increasing the valuable organic matter in the lawn and garden. Compost is a valuable soil conditioner that can be used in gardens, around trees and on lawns.

Continued in... Composting Yard Waste

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